Students in class

Computer-Aided Design Specialist

Career Studies Certificate

PURPOSE: The rapidly evolving field of computer technology has had a dramatic impact on the architectural/engineering professions. The Computer-Aided Design Specialist Career Studies Certificate was created to meet the contemporary graphic needs of architectural and industrial design firms. This program provides the student with thorough training in two- and three-dimensional computer graphics, including studies in visualization and animation.

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: CAD Technician, Forensic Computer Technician, Presentation (Rendering) Graphics Specialist, and possibly CAD Manager

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/GE_Info_221-729-01.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program.

COURSE

TITLE

LEC.
HRS.

LAB.
HRS.

CRS.
CRE.

CSC 155

Computer Concepts and Applications

3

0

3

DRF 231

Computer-Aided Drafting I

2

2

3

DRF 232

Computer-Aided Drafting II

2

2

3

DRF 238

Computer-Aided Modeling and Rendering

2

2

3

ARC 211 
or 
CIV 270

Computer-Aided Drafting Applications or Utilizing Surveying Software

2

2

3

DRF 233

Computer-Aided Drafting III

2

2

3

___ ___1

General Education Elective

3

0

3

TOTAL

16

10

21

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Computer-Aided Design Specialist 21

03.11.15

1 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. Students may also take ENG 111.

DRAFTING

DRF 111 Technical Drafting I 3 cr.

Introduces technical drafting from the fundamentals through advanced drafting practices. Teaches lettering, metric construction, technical sketching, orthographic projection, sections, intersections, development, fasteners, theory, and applications of dimensioning and tolerances. Includes pictorial drawing and preparation of working and detailed drawings.Lecture 2 hours.Laboratory 3 hours.Total 5 hours per week.

DRF 165 Architectural Blueprint Reading 3 cr.

Emphasizes reading, understanding, and interpreting standard types of architectural drawing, including plans, elevations, sections, and details.Lecture 2 hours.Laboratory 2 hours.Total 4 hours per week.

DRF 231 Computer-Aided Drafting I 3 cr.

Teaches computer-aided drafting concepts and equipment. Develops a general understanding of components and operating a typical CAD system. DRF 111 is recommended for individuals with no experience in technical drawing prior to enrolling in DRF 231.Lecture 2 hours.Laboratory 2 hours.Total 4 hours per week.

DRF 232 Computer-Aided Drafting II 3 cr.

Teaches advanced operation in computer-aided drafting.Prerequisite: DRF 231.Lecture 2 hours.Laboratory 2 hours.Total 4 hours per week.

DRF 233 Computer-Aided Drafting III 3 cr.

Introduces programming skills and exposes students to geometric modeling. Focuses on proficiency in production drawing using a CAD system.Prerequisite: DRF 232.Lecture 2 hours.Laboratory 2 hours.Total 4 hours per week.

DRF 238 Computer-Aided Modeling and Rendering I 3 cr.

Focuses on training students in the contemporary techniques of 3D modeling, rendering, and animation on the personal computer. Introduces the principles of visualization, sometimes known as photo-realism, which enable the student to create presentation drawings for both architectural and industrial product design. Uses computer animation to produce walk-throughs that will bring the third dimension to architectural designs. 3-D Studio is the primary software used in this course. Part I of II.Prerequisite: DRF 232.Lecture 2 hours.Laboratory 2 hours.Total 4 hours per week.

DRF 239 Computer-Aided Modeling and Rendering II 3 cr.

Focuses on training students in the contemporary techniques of 3D modeling, rendering, and animation on the personal computer. Introduces the principles of visualization, sometimes known as photo-realism, which enable the student to create presentation drawings for both architectural and industrial product design. Uses computer animation to produce walk-throughs that will bring the third dimension to architectural designs. Part II of II.Prerequisite: DRF 238.Lecture 2 hours.Laboratory 2 hours.Total 4 hours per week.

DRF 299 Supervised Study in Drafting: Computer-Aided Modeling and Rendering I 3 cr.

Focuses on training students in the contemporary techniques of 3D modeling, rendering, and animation on the personal computer. Introduces the principles of visualization, sometimes known as photo-realism, which enable the student to create presentation drawings for both architectural and industrial product design. Uses computer animation to produce walk-throughs that will bring the third dimension to architectural designs.Prerequisite: DRF 232.Lecture 2 hours.Laboratory 2 hours.Total 4 hours per week.

Name Program Email Phone
Wendell Andrews CAD Specialist CSC wandrews@reynolds.edu 523-5586
Aubrey Bass CAD Specialist CSC sbass@reynolds.edu 523-5600

Common Job Titles1: Architect; Architectural Designer; Architectural Drafter; Architectural Draftsman; Architectural Intern; CAD Technician (Computer-Aided Design Technician); Civil CAD Designer (Civil Computer Aided Design Designer); Civil CAD Tech (Civil Computer-Aided Design Technician); Civil Drafter; Computer-Aided Design Designer (CAD Designer); Computer-Aided Design Operator (CAD Operator); Computer-Aided Design Technician (CAD Technician); Computer-Aided Drafting and Design Drafter (CADD Drafter); Drafter; Drafting Technician; Draftsman; Draftsperson; Intern Architect; Project Manager


Labor Market Statistics (Richmond, MSA)

Projected number of jobs by 2026: 455

Current Wage Range (Entry - Experienced): $37,600 - $65,200


Green Occupation "Green occupations will likely change as a result of the green economy. Green economy activities and technologies are increasing the demand for occupations, shaping the work and worker requirements needed for occupational performance, or generating new and emerging occupations." -- O*NET

1 This program may prepare you for one or more of the listed jobs; however, graduates may not be qualified for all of the jobs listed in this section.

Reynolds Community College makes every attempt to provide students with the best, most accuarate information possible. The data was sourced from external agencies (O*NET and JobsEQ) on February 08, 2017.