Engineering

Engineering

Associate of Science

SPECIALIZATIONS:  
Mechanical/General Engineering Specialization
Chemical/Biological Engineering Specialization
Electrical/Computer Engineering Specialization

PURPOSE: The demand for technically trained people is increasing rapidly in Virginia as well as throughout the world. The engineer is a most important member of the technical team, which includes the scientist, technician, and skilled craftsman. Opportunities are unlimited for men and women in the field of engineering. Science is so diversified now that one may enter almost any specialization and find employment. The preparation for the engineering profession is based on a rigorous program, especially in mathematics and science.

The Associate of Science degree in Engineering is designed for persons who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university to complete a baccalaureate degree in one of the following engineering fields: aerospace, agriculture, architecture, biomedical, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, environmental, industrial, materials, mechanical, mining, nuclear, or ocean.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

The Mechanical/General Engineering specialization is designed for persons who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university to pursue a degree in mechanical, civil, aerospace, ocean, or mining engineering. For students who do not yet know which discipline they want to pursue, this specialization provides a fundamental engineering education that will help prepare students for a future in any engineering field.

The Chemical/Biological Engineering specialization is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university to pursue a bachelor’s degree in chemical, biomedical, biological, or environmental engineering.

The Electrical/Computer Engineering specialization is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university to pursue a degree in electrical or computer engineering.

PROGRAM NOTES: Applicants shall have (a) completed placement testing and (b) met with their advisor to establish a planned course of study prior to being allowed to register for courses.

Satisfactory completion of the following high school units or their equivalent, at a minimum, is strongly recommended: four units of English, one unit of laboratory science (preferably physical science), one unit of social studies, and four units of mathematics (two units of algebra, one unit of plane geometry, one unit of advanced mathematics or trigonometry and solid geometry).

This program requires a steady progression through at least four high-level mathematics courses, generally taken at a rate of one per semester. MTH 173 and MTH 174 are pre- or co-requisites for several engineering courses. Applicants who place into developmental mathematics will face additional mathematics courses, which do not count toward degree progress, before even qualifying for MTH 173. Accordingly, applicants are urged to study their math thoroughly before taking the mathematics placement test to avoid having to repeat one or more mathematics courses unnecessarily.

This program includes the courses usually required in the first two years of a baccalaureate engineering curriculum. The minimum number of credits required for graduation from the Reynolds Engineering AS degree is 68. Students should consult with their engineering advisor at the earliest possible date to acquaint themselves with the requirements of the engineering program at the college or university to which transfer is planned.

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by passing the computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, or by completing either ITE 115, Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts, or CSC 155, Computer Concepts and Applications, or equivalent. CSC 155 is preferred for students in this program. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once.

Mechanical/General Engineering

COURSE

TITLE

LEC.
HRS.

LAB.
HRS.

CRS.
CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

CHM 1111

College Chemistry I

3

3

4

MTH 173

Calculus with Analytic Geometry I

5

0

5

EGR 124

Introduction to Engineering and Engineering Methods

3

0

3

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

___ ___2

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

TOTAL

15-16

3-5

17

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

EGR 1103
or
CSC 130
3

Engineering Graphics
or
Scientific Programming

2

4

2

0

3

4

EGR 140
or
EGR ___4

Engineering Mechanics – Statics or Engineering Elective

3

0

3

MTH 174

Calculus with Analytic Geometry II

5

0

5

___ ___2

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

TOTAL

16-18

0-2

17-18

PHY 241

University Physics I

3

3

4

EGR ___4

Engineering Elective

3

0-3

3-4

MTH 277

Vector Calculus

4

0

4

EGR 206
or
EGR ___4

Engineering Economy
or
Engineering Elective

3

0

3

___ ___2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

TOTAL

16

3-6

17-18

EGR ___4

Engineering Elective

3

0-3

3-4

___ ___2

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

___ ___2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

PHY 242

University Physics II

3

3

4

MTH 279

Ordinary Differential Equations

4

0

4

TOTAL

16

3-6

17-18

Total Minimum Credits for AS Degree in Engineering, Mechanical/General Engineering Specialization

68


 

CURRICULUM:
Chemical/Biomedical Specialization

COURSE

TITLE

LEC.
HRS.

LAB.
HRS.

CRS.
CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

CHM 1111

College Chemistry I

3

3

4

MTH 173

Calculus with Analytic Geometry I

5

0

5

EGR 124

Introduction to Engineering and Engineering Methods

3

0

3

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

___ ___2

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

TOTAL

15-16

3-5

17

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

EGR 1103
or
CSC 130
3

Engineering Graphics
or
Scientific Programming

2

4

2

0

3

4

CHM 112

College Chemistry II

3

1

4

MTH 174

Calculus with Analytic Geometry II

5

0

5

___ ___2

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

TOTAL

16-18

0-3

18-19

PHY 241

University Physics I

3

3

4

___ ___5

Chemical/Biological Engineering Elective

3

0-3

3-4

MTH 277

Vector Calculus

4

0

4

___ ___5

Chemical/Biological Engineering Elective

3

0

3

___ ___2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

TOTAL

16

3-6

17-18

___ ___5

Chemical/Biological Engineering Elective

3

0-3

3-4

___ ___2

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

___ ___2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

PHY 242

University Physics II

3

3

4

MTH 279

Ordinary Differential Equations

4

0

4

TOTAL

16

3-6

17-18

Total Minimum Credits for AS Degree in Engineering, Chemical/Biomedical Specialization

68

 

CURRICULUM:
Electrical/Computer Specialization

COURSE

TITLE

LEC.
HRS.

LAB.
HRS.

CRS.
CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

CHM 1111

College Chemistry I

3

3

4

MTH 173

Calculus with Analytic Geometry I

5

0

5

EGR 124

Introduction to Engineering and Engineering Methods

3

0

3

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

___ ___2

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

TOTAL

15-16

3-5

17

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

CSC 130

Scientific Programming

4

0

4

EGR 206
or
EGR ___6

Engineering Economy or

Electrical/Computer Engineering Elective

3

0

3

MTH 174

Calculus with Analytic Geometry II

5

0

5

___ ___2

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

TOTAL

18

0

18

PHY 241

University Physics I

3

3

4

EGR 251

Basic Electric Circuits I

3

0

3

EGR 255

Electric Circuits Laboratory

0

1

1

CSC 210

Programming with C++

3

0

3

MTH 277

Vector Calculus

4

0

4

___ ___2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

TOTAL

16

4

18

MTH 285

Linear Algebra

3

0

3

___ ___2

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

___ ___2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

PHY 242

University Physics II

3

3

4

MTH 279

Ordinary Differential Equations

4

0

4

TOTAL

16

3

17

Total Minimum Credits for AS Degree in Engineering, Electrical/Computer Specialization

68

02.02.2016

1 CHM 112 may be required by some four-year institutions for their engineering baccalaureate degree programs. Students should verify the chemistry requirements of the institutions to which they plan to transfer.

2 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

3 EGR 110 and EGR 124 transfer together as a package for all disciplines at Virginia Tech. Either course by itself will not be accepted by Virginia Tech. EGR 110 and EGR 124 as a package are required for Mechanical Engineering or Nuclear Engineering at VCU. CSC 130 or equivalent and EGR 124 are required as a package for Electrical or Computer Engineering at VCU. EGR 123 and EGR 124 will still be accepted by VCU as a package for students who have successfully completed these courses. Students should consult their engineering program advisor for assistance with selecting the appropriate course(s) for other disciplines at VCU or other transfer institutions.

4 Engineering electives are: EGR 110, EGR 245, EGR 246, EGR 248, EGR 251, EGR 255, MTH 285, CSC 130, and CSC 210.

5 Chemical/Biological Engineering electives are: CHM 241 and lab, CHM 242 and lab, MTH 285, EGR 140, EGR 246, EGR 110, EGR 206, EGR 251 and 255, EGR 248, BIO 101, and BIO 102.

6 Electrical/Computer Engineering electives are: EGR 110, EGR 206, and EGR 248.

NOTES: 1) Virginia Tech requires a two-credit linear algebra course. That requirement can be satisfied by completing MTH 285 at Reynolds. 2) Students should consult with their Engineering advisor at the earliest possible date to acquaint themselves with the requirements of the Engineering program at the college or university to which transfer is planned.

ENGINEERING

EGR 110 Engineering Graphics 3 cr.

Presents theories and principles of orthographic projection. Studies multiview, pictorial drawings and sketches, geometric construction, sectioning, lettering, tolerancing, dimensioning, and auxiliary projections. Studies the analysis and graphic presentation of space relationships of fundamental geometric elements: points, lines, planes, and solids. Includes instruction in computer-aided drafting.Lecture 2 hours.Laboratory 2 hours.Total 4 hours per week.

EGR 124 Introduction to Engineering and Engineering Methods 3 cr.

Introduces the engineering profession, professionalism, and ethics. Covers problem presentation, engineering calculations, and digital computer applications; word processing, worksheets, and databases; programming in languages, such as MATLAB, FORTRAN, or C++; elementary numerical methods; and other skills required for computer competency.Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MTH 173.Lecture 3 hours per week.

EGR 140 Engineering Mechanics - Statics 3 cr.

Introduces mechanics of vector forces and space, scalar mass and time, including S.I. and U.S. customary units. Teaches equilibrium, free-body diagrams, moments, couples, distributed forces, centroids, moments of inertia, analysis of two-force and multi-force members, and friction and internal forces.Prerequisite: MTH 173.Lecture 3 hours per week.

EGR 206 Engineering Economy 3 cr.

Presents economic analysis of engineering alternatives. Studies economic and cost concepts, calculation of economic equivalence, comparison of alternatives, replacement economy, economic optimization in design and operation, depreciation, and after-tax analysis.Prerequisite or Co-requisite: ENG 111.Lecture 3 hours per week.

EGR 245 Engineering Mechanics - Dynamics 3 cr.

Presents approach to kinematics of particles in linear and curvilinear motion. Includes kinematics of rigid bodies in plane motion. Teaches Newton's second law, work-energy and power, impulse and momentum, and problem solving using computers.Prerequisite: EGR 140.Lecture 3 hours per week.

EGR 246 Mechanics of Materials 3 cr.

Teaches concepts of stress, strain, deformation, internal equilibrium, and basic properties of engineering materials. Analyzes axial loads, torsion, bending, shear, and combined loading. Studies stress transformation and principle stresses, column analysis, and energy principles.Prerequisite: EGR 140.Lecture 3 hours per week.

EGR 248 Thermodynamics for Engineers 3 cr.

Studies formulation of the first and second law of thermodynamics. Presents energy conversion, concepts of energy, temperature, entropy, enthalpy, and equations of state of fluids. Covers reversibility and irreversibility in processes, closed and open systems, cyclical processes, and problem solving using computers.Prerequisite: MTH 173.Lecture 3 hours per week.

EGR 251 Basic Electric Circuits I 3 cr.

Teaches fundamentals of electric circuits. Includes circuit quantities of charge, current, potential, power, and energy. Teaches resistive circuit analysis; Ohm's and Kirchoff's laws; nodal and mesh analysis; network theorems; and RC, RL, and RLC circuit transient response with constant forcing functions. Teaches AC steady-state analysis, power, and three-phase circuits. Presents frequency domain analysis, resonance, Fourier series, inductively coupled circuits, Laplace transform applications, and circuit transfer functions. Introduces problem solving using computers.Prerequisite: MTH 174 or equivalent.Lecture 3 hours per week.

EGR 255 Electric Circuits Laboratory 1 cr.

Teaches principles and operation of laboratory instruments such as VOM, electronic voltmeters, digital multimeters, oscilloscopes, counters, wave generators, and power supplies. Presents application to circuit measurements, including transient and steady-state response of simple networks with laboratory applications of laws and theories of circuits plus measurement of AC quantities.Co-requisite: EGR 251.Laboratory 3 hours per week

Name Program Email Phone
Sylvia Clay Engineering AS sclay@reynolds.edu 523-5587